Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery in Beverly Hills – Dr. Guy Massry
13Apr/110

History Lesson 101 #3 – BOTOX®: How Ophthalmology Paved the Way /For Its Use

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Botulinum toxin is a nerve/muscle weakening agent used for cosmetic reasons to treat facial wrinkles.  It was first used in medicine to treat crossed eyes in children based on the pioneering work of an ophthalmologist, Dr. Allan Scott.  In the late 80’s Allergan bought the distribution rights to the toxin and in 1989 (in the United States) the FDA approved the use of BOTOX® (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the treatment of crossed eyes and spasms in the eye muscles – BOTOX WAS BORN.

With further research doctors noted that Botox temporarily treated excessive sweating and helped in the care of contractures (muscle spasms) in patients with cerebral palsy.

In the 1990’s, Dr. Jean Carruthers, also an ophthalmologist, noted that Botox made her patients look wrinkle free.  She, and her husband (a dermatologist) later documented that Botox was able to temporarily reduce frown lines.

In December 2000, BOTOX® was approved by the FDA for the treatment of the abnormal head position and neck pain that happens with cervical dystonia (CD) in people 16 years and older.

In April 2002 the same formulation of Botox neurotoxin was approved by the FDA under the name BOTOX® Cosmetic (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the temporary treatment of frown lines in patients 18 to 65 years of age, and two years later for excessive underarm sweating, in people 18 years and older when medicines used on the skin (topical) do not work well enough.

In March 2010, BOTOX® was granted approval by the FDA for the treatment of increased muscle stiffness in the elbow, wrist and finger muscles in people 18 years and older with upper limb spasticity

Today the use of BOTOX® for facial dynamic wrinkles is a booming industry and one of the mainstays in minimally invasive cosmetic facial enhancements.

OPHTHALMOLOGISTS (eye physicians) were instrumental players in the development of the therapeutic use of BOTOX®

This makes sense as so much Botox is given in areas around the eyes.

Please make sure any practitioner giving you Botox is very familiar with the intricate anatomy of the eyes and surrounding areas

You can contact my office for a consultation regarding the use of and treatment with Botox at (310) 453-8474 or through my web site at drmassry.com

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